-

TRUTH, RACIAL HEALING & TRANSFORMATION

Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation (TRHT) is a comprehensive, national and community-based process to bring about transformational and sustainable change. Through TRHT, collaborators address the historic and contemporary effects of racism in their communities and institutions. They work to replace the deeply held belief system that fuels racism with one that sees the inherent value of all people.

The effects of racism are evident all around us. They can be seen in the places where we live, learn, work and play, in our social interactions and the systems and policies that disrupt the lives of so many children and families. People experience these effects when they take their children to school, apply for jobs, rent or buy a home, visit a doctor or try to access healthy food, in interactions with the police and more.

TRHT builds relationships and collective power at the community and institutional level. These relationships lay the groundwork for powerful systemic change, as participants reshape their communities’ institutions, policies and practices.

Racial healing is at the heart of racial equity.

A core tenet of this work is racial healing. To heal means to restore to wholeness.

Racial healing is:

  • the people work that leads to the transformation of systems;
  • the telling of hard truths about past wrongs and present consequences;
  • repairing the harm of racism;
  • authentic relationship-building across real and perceived differences.

Racism affects all of us, whether we are aware of it or not. It affects our ability to know, relate to and value one another. Systemically, it is one of the biggest obstacles to solving the challenges we face in our communities

Through racial healing and relationship-building, we can collectively develop new values that affect our everyday decisions in areas of policy making, hiring, education and housing – to name just a few.

play_circle_outlineWatch How TRHT is Making an Impact
Implementing the

TRHT FRAMEWORK

The TRHT framework helps individuals, communities, institutions and professional sectors heal from the past and present-day harms of racism and activate change in our communities. Through a series of discussions, utilizing the TRHT Implementation Guidebook, each community, institution, group or network envisions a collective life beyond racism and gains understanding of the predominant factors and conditions that are blocking progress. Stakeholders, including recognized and under-recognized leaders and those most impacted by racism, then devise plans for transformation around the five TRHT pillars.

The two foundational pillars for every TRHT effort are:

  • Narrative change and truth-telling
  • Racial healing and relationship building

Communities also choose to pursue work around one or all of the following pillars:

  • Separation (segregation, colonization, concentrated poverty)
  • Law
  • Economy

From the beginning, TRHT was designed by community and through collaboration. Community-led collaboration – that is cross-racial, intergenerational and cross-sector – remains the centerpiece of all TRHT efforts.

Narrative Change

Examining how to create and distribute new complex and complete narratives in entertainment, journalism, digital and social media, school curricula, museums, monuments and parks and in the way we communicate that can influence people’s perspectives, perceptions and behaviors about and towards one another so that we can work more effectively and productively towards community-based change.

Racial Healing and Relationship Building

Focusing on ways for all of us to heal from the wounds of the past, to build mutually respectful relationships across racial and ethnic lines that honor and value each person’s humanity, and to build trusting intergenerational and diverse community relationships that better reflect our common humanity.

Separation

Examining and finding ways to address segregation, colonization and concentrated poverty in neighborhoods to ultimately ensure equitable access to health, education and jobs.

Law

Reviewing discriminatory civil and criminal laws and the public policies that come from them and recommending solutions that will produce a just application of the law.

Economy

Studying structured inequality and barriers to economic opportunities and recommending approaches that can create an equitable society.

The TRHT Framework
An Expanding

TRHT MOVEMENT

TRHT emerged in 2016 as an approach to racial equity work that connects healing with systemic transformation. Launched by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, TRHT was designed in partnership with 176 leaders and scholars, representing more than 144 organizations. Since then, TRHT has expanded well beyond WKKF’s grantee partners and now exists in communities, in organizations and on college campuses across the United States.

Communities across the United States experience everyday disruptions and confront major crises born of racism. Transforming the systems in which racism is embedded takes each one of us, in each of our communities, sectors and spheres of influence. It requires individual and collective commitments to racial healing, building the relationships and mobilizing the energy for transformative vision, plans and action.

10 Grantees from 14 Communities
Bringing

TRHT TO LIFE

The following communities and their coordinating organizations are undertaking a TRHT process with the following intentions:

Alaska
First Alaskans Institute

State of Alaska

arrow_drop_down
TRHT Alaska

First Alaskans Institute

Starting in 2017, Alaska TRHT developed a relational platform for transformation, which included an extensive network of “accountability partners” or people with the power to transform systems. Accountability partners were asked to support efforts related to Indigenous language education; transformation of public education; and the advancement of policies that center Alaska Native stewardship and protect Alaska Native ways of being. In addition, they trained media outlets on racial equity and invited them to be accountability partners.

Michigan
Council of Michigan Foundations

Battle Creek, Flint, Kalamazoo and Lansing, MI

arrow_drop_down
TRHT Michigan

Council of Michigan Foundations

Battle Creek, Mich.
In WKKF’s hometown of Battle Creek, TRHT has been alive and well since 2017. Collaborators have held racial healing dialogues in English, Spanish and Burmese. They created a new multi-racial narrative of the town’s history and present-day reality through the publishing of oral histories. Relating to the separation pillar, the local realtors’ association chapter engaged in racial equity trainings and developing new practices.

Flint, Mich.
In 2017, when community stakeholders pulled together to envision Flint TRHT, trust was low and trauma was significant in the wake of the city’s water crisis. From 2017-2022, racial healing circles cultivated healthier relationships and laid the groundwork for multi-sector transformative work around the separation and law pillars. Residents of a new mixed-income housing development built bridges through racial healing circles and more than 70 police officers participated in circles to begin healing their own racial biases.

Kalamazoo, Mich.
Kalamazoo is implementing a vision for work in each of the five TRHT pillars: narrative change, racial healing & relationship building, separation, law and economy. They formed a multi-generational leadership team to design the process locally. With data driving their plans and racial healing at the core, TRHT Kalamazoo addresses fair housing practices and policies; voting rights, incarceration, detention and eviction rates for those with convictions, the cash bail system and ICE holds; and issues like living wages, employment access, predatory lending and community benefit agreements.

Lansing, Mich.
From 2017-2022, TRHT Lansing was both youth-led and multi-generational by design. All the participating organizations chose work that supported youth and young adults who are impacted by racism every day. Community members from the grassroots to the grass tops committed to attending racial healing circles. Leaders within the law and criminal justice sectors learned from stories shared in racial healing circles and are bringing racial healing processes into their sectors. As a result, a vision to reshape practices and polices around racial equity has been adopted by the county prosecutor’s office and Lansing Fire Department.

content_copyVisit Website
Louisiana
Foundation for Louisiana

Baton Rouge and New Orleans, LA

arrow_drop_down
TRHT Louisiana

Foundation for Louisiana

TRHT New Orleans lifts up the pre-existing racial healing, healing justice and mutual aid efforts within the city. Collaborators activated a community of practice for local racial healing practitioners committed to developing an infrastructure of care. In Baton Rouge, TRHT addresses law and separation, by focusing on developing leadership in housing, police reform and immigrants rights. Work in law enforcement includes a police accountability table where residents and police work together to heal from trauma, especially in the wake of the high-profile police-killing of Alton Sterling. They are also supporting the YWCA’s work to transform the cash bail system, which has a detrimental impact on the economic wellbeing of Black men and their families.

content_copyVisit Website
New York
Community Foundation for Greater Buffalo

Buffalo, NY

arrow_drop_down
TRHT Buffalo

Community Foundation for Greater Buffalo

Every system that touches the lives of children and families is being influenced by TRHT Buffalo, including criminal & juvenile justice, workforce, family support, transportation, the corporate sector and faith communities. Acknowledging that inequitable practices in one system are reinforced by other systems, racial healing and transformation efforts have grown within and across each of these sectors.

content_copyVisit Website
Illinois
Woods Fund of Chicago/The Chicago Community Trust

Greater Chicago, IL

arrow_drop_down
TRHT Chicago

Woods Fund of Chicago/The Chicago Community Trust

In 2017, 300 people from across the metropolitan region collaboratively developed a vision of Chicago without racism, defined community priorities and developed strategies to reach their goals. Racial healing was front and center through the training of healing practitioners from downtown through neighborhoods and into the suburbs in 2020. In 2022, they began incorporating work in law and policy through the Truth, Healing and Equity Fellowship, which aims to build capacity for creating equitable organizations.

content_copyVisit Website
Texas
Communities Foundation of Texas

Dallas, TX

arrow_drop_down
TRHT Dallas

Communities Foundation of Texas

From day one, TRHT Dallas grounded their work in truth-telling, starting with compiling the racial history of the community, including documenting historical policies and practices. They engaged the community’s young people and representatives of law enforcement, philanthropy and virtually every sector in the community to envision “a radically inclusive” Dallas. This led to the creation of Racial Equity NOW, which builds the capacity of organizations and leaders around racial equity and policy implementation.

content_copyVisit Website
California
Southern California Grantmakers

Los Angeles, CA

arrow_drop_down
TRHT Los Angeles

Southern California Grantmakers

From 2017-2022, TRHT Los Angeles made significant advances in racial healing, narrative change and the economy. Building understanding of the racialized history of their area and ongoing impacts, they studied the incarceration of Japanese-Americans during WW2, the history of colonization and the 1871 Chinese Massacre. Collaborators successfully initiated a campaign leading to the recognition of three new public holidays and installation of new monuments and collaborated with the LA County Arts Commission and Echo Park Film Center on arts-based narrative change work. TRHT Los Angeles also offered implicit bias trainings across the philanthropy, nonprofit, corporate and business sectors and partnered with the LA Chamber of Commerce to advocate for immigrant workers and an inclusive workforce. Dialogues with grassroots organizations and members across various LA communities led to the formation of the first ever Los Angeles Office of Racial Equity.

content_copyVisit Website
Virginia
Initiatives of Change

Richmond, VA

arrow_drop_down
TRHT Richmond

Initiatives of Change

Utilizing the therapeutic effects of creativity, from 2017-2020 TRHT Richmond focused on narrative change and brought together local artists: unearthing historical narratives, telling truths about the community’s past and engaging local residents in envisioning a more equitable future. Artists shared these narratives and visions through visual art, movement and yoga, documentaries, books and websites and covered subjects such as food injustice, wellness, the local history of Black women’s labor, gentrification, obesity and self-esteem. Trainings encouraged faith leaders to bring racial healing messages and racial equity practices to their congregations and communities.

Alabama
Black Belt Community Foundation

Selma, AL

arrow_drop_down
TRHT Selma

Black Belt Community Foundation

TRHT Selma is addressing all five pillars, grounded in wide community engagement through a Grassroots Advisory Team and a Multi-Sector Team. Collaborators are utilizing innovative approaches to combining racial healing with narrative change including: a series on the history of race in the U.S. paired with Kingian Nonviolence trainings; a Know Your Roots project related to discovering ancestors’ roles in history; and a Middle Passage reenactment. With the separation and law pillars, TRHT Selma focuses on restorative justice and nonviolent conflict resolution in local schools, community-police dialogues and conflict resolution processes to reduce violence and incarceration. Economy work centers on developing a sustainable tourism industry in Selma, supporting entrepreneurs, training women in financial literacy and developing an organizing model to confront gentrification and displacement.

content_copyVisit Website
Minnesota
Saint Paul Foundation

Saint Paul, MN

arrow_drop_down
TRHT Saint Paul

Saint Paul Foundation

From 2017-2019, TRHT Saint Paul focused on narrative change, forming a partnership among six media outlets. Partners included large, well-resourced, nationally known organizations and small, community-led organizations. Their collaboration offered media professionals an opportunity to meet, build trust and learn about the impact of negative narratives on people and communities of color. TRHT Saint Paul also engaged young Black men and boys in designing a media campaign named for Gordon Parks, the internationally known photographer and filmmaker who first picked up a camera during his teen years in Saint Paul. The mentorship program assisted youth to develop new internal narratives and visions.

content_copyVisit Website
TRHT Alaska

First Alaskans Institute

Starting in 2017, Alaska TRHT developed a relational platform for transformation, which included an extensive network of “accountability partners” or people with the power to transform systems. Accountability partners were asked to support efforts related to Indigenous language education; transformation of public education; and the advancement of policies that center Alaska Native stewardship and protect Alaska Native ways of being. In addition, they trained media outlets on racial equity and invited them to be accountability partners.

TRHT Michigan

Council of Michigan Foundations

Battle Creek, Mich.
In WKKF’s hometown of Battle Creek, TRHT has been alive and well since 2017. Collaborators have held racial healing dialogues in English, Spanish and Burmese. They created a new multi-racial narrative of the town’s history and present-day reality through the publishing of oral histories. Relating to the separation pillar, the local realtors’ association chapter engaged in racial equity trainings and developing new practices.

Flint, Mich.
In 2017, when community stakeholders pulled together to envision Flint TRHT, trust was low and trauma was significant in the wake of the city’s water crisis. From 2017-2022, racial healing circles cultivated healthier relationships and laid the groundwork for multi-sector transformative work around the separation and law pillars. Residents of a new mixed-income housing development built bridges through racial healing circles and more than 70 police officers participated in circles to begin healing their own racial biases.

Kalamazoo, Mich.
Kalamazoo is implementing a vision for work in each of the five TRHT pillars: narrative change, racial healing & relationship building, separation, law and economy. Collaborators formed a multi-generational leadership team to design the process locally. With data driving their plans and racial healing at the core, TRHT Kalamazoo addresses fair housing practices and policies; voting rights, incarceration, detention and eviction rates for those with convictions, the cash bail system and ICE holds; and issues like living wages, employment access, predatory lending and community benefit agreements.

Lansing, Mich.
From 2017-2022, TRHT Lansing was both youth-led and multi-generational by design. All the participating organizations chose work that supported youth and young adults who are impacted by racism every day. Community members from the grassroots to the grass tops committed to attending racial healing circles. Leaders within the law and criminal justice sectors learned from stories shared in racial healing circles and are bringing racial healing processes into their sectors. As a result, a vision to reshape practices and polices around racial equity has been adopted by the county prosecutor’s office and Lansing Fire Department.

content_copyVisit Website
TRHT Louisiana

Foundation for Louisiana

TRHT New Orleans lifts up the pre-existing racial healing, healing justice and mutual aid efforts within the city. Collaborators activated a community of practice for local racial healing practitioners committed to developing an infrastructure of care. In Baton Rouge, TRHT addresses law and separation, by focusing on developing leadership in housing, police reform and immigrants rights. Work in law enforcement includes a police accountability table where residents and police work together to heal from trauma, especially in the wake of the high-profile police-killing of Alton Sterling. They are also supporting the YWCA’s work to transform the cash bail system, which has a detrimental impact on the economic wellbeing of Black men and their families.

content_copyVisit Website
TRHT Buffalo

Community Foundation for Greater Buffalo

Every system that touches the lives of children and families is being influenced by TRHT Buffalo, including criminal & juvenile justice, workforce, family support, transportation, the corporate sector and faith communities. Acknowledging that inequitable practices in one system are reinforced by other systems, racial healing and transformation efforts have grown within and across each of these sectors.

content_copyVisit Website
TRHT Chicago

Woods Fund of Chicago/The Chicago Community Trust

In 2017, 300 people from across the metropolitan region collaboratively developed a vision of Chicago without racism, defined community priorities and developed strategies to reach their goals. Racial healing was front and center through the training of healing practitioners from downtown through neighborhoods and into the suburbs in 2020. In 2022, collaborators began incorporating work in law and policy through the Truth, Healing and Equity Fellowship, which aims to build capacity for creating equitable organizations.

content_copyVisit Website
TRHT Dallas

Communities Foundation of Texas

From day one, TRHT Dallas grounded their work in truth-telling, starting with compiling the racial history of the community, including documenting historical policies and practices. Collaborators engaged the community’s young people and representatives of law enforcement, philanthropy and virtually every sector in the community to envision “a radically inclusive” Dallas. This led to the creation of Racial Equity NOW, which builds the capacity of organizations and leaders around racial equity and policy implementation.

content_copyVisit Website
TRHT Los Angeles

Southern California Grantmakers

From 2017-2022, TRHT Los Angeles made significant advances in racial healing, narrative change and the economy. Building understanding of the racialized history of their area and ongoing impacts, they studied the incarceration of Japanese-Americans during WW2, the history of colonization and the 1871 Chinese Massacre. Collaborators successfully initiated a campaign leading to the recognition of three new public holidays and installation of new monuments and collaborated with the LA County Arts Commission and Echo Park Film Center on arts-based narrative change work. TRHT Los Angeles also offered implicit bias trainings across the philanthropy, nonprofit, corporate and business sectors and partnered with the LA Chamber of Commerce to advocate for immigrant workers and an inclusive workforce. Dialogues with grassroots organizations and members across various LA communities led to the formation of the first ever Los Angeles Office of Racial Equity.

content_copyVisit Website
TRHT Richmond

Initiatives of Change

Utilizing the therapeutic effects of creativity, from 2017-2020 TRHT Richmond focused on narrative change and brought together local artists: unearthing historical narratives, telling truths about the community’s past and engaging local residents in envisioning a more equitable future. Artists shared these narratives and visions through visual art, movement and yoga, documentaries, books and websites and covered subjects such as food injustice, wellness, the local history of Black women’s labor, gentrification, obesity and self-esteem. Trainings encouraged faith leaders to bring racial healing messages and racial equity practices to their congregations and communities.

TRHT Selma

Black Belt Community Foundation

TRHT Selma is addressing all five pillars, grounded in wide community engagement through a Grassroots Advisory Team and a Multi-Sector Team. Collaborators are utilizing innovative approaches to combining racial healing with narrative change including: a series on the history of race in the U.S. paired with Kingian Nonviolence trainings; a Know Your Roots project related to discovering ancestors’ roles in history; and a Middle Passage reenactment. With the separation and law pillars, TRHT Selma focuses on restorative justice and nonviolent conflict resolution in local schools, community-police dialogues and conflict resolution processes to reduce violence and incarceration. Economy work centers on developing a sustainable tourism industry in Selma, supporting entrepreneurs, training women in financial literacy and developing an organizing model to confront gentrification and displacement.

content_copyVisit Website
TRHT Saint Paul

Saint Paul Foundation

From 2017-2019, TRHT Saint Paul focused on narrative change, forming a partnership among six media outlets. Partners included large, well-resourced, nationally known organizations and small, community-led organizations. Their collaboration offered media professionals an opportunity to meet, build trust and learn about the impact of negative narratives on people and communities of color. TRHT Saint Paul also engaged young Black men and boys in designing a media campaign named for Gordon Parks, the internationally known photographer and filmmaker who first picked up a camera during his teen years in Saint Paul. The mentorship program assisted youth to develop new internal narratives and visions.

content_copyVisit Website
Looking for Answers?

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation (TRHT)?

arrow_drop_down

Launched in 2016, TRHT is a comprehensive, national and community-based process to plan for and bring about transformational and sustainable change, and to address the historic and contemporary effects of racism. At its core, TRHT will unearth and jettison the deeply held, and often unconscious, beliefs created by racism – the main one being the belief in a “hierarchy of human value.” This belief has fueled racism and conscious and unconscious bias throughout American culture and the perception of inferiority or superiority based on race, physical characteristics or place of origin.

What will TRHT do?

arrow_drop_down

TRHT will help communities across the U.S. embrace racial healing and uproot the conscious and unconscious belief in a hierarchy of human value that limits equal access to quality education, fulfilling employment, safe neighborhoods, equal housing opportunities and quality health care. Unless the central belief system that fuels racial, ethnic, and place of origin inequities is challenged and changed, societal progress cannot be sustained over time.

Who is involved in TRHT?

arrow_drop_down

Throughout its 2016 design phase, WKKF worked with 176 leaders and scholars as representatives of more than 144 national TRHT individual and organizational partners, with a reach of more than 289 million people. The result of those efforts was a set of recommendations and an Implementation Guide to inform community-based TRHT processes. In 2017, there are multi-sector collaborations of people in 14 places across the United States who have received Kellogg Foundation grants, in addition to other national, regional and local funding, to implement a TRHT process.

Where is TRHT happening?

arrow_drop_down

TRHT is a national effort and throughout the next two-to-five years there will be place-based TRHT processes in 14 communities, including: (1) State of Alaska; (2) Baton Rouge and (3) New Orleans, Louisiana; (4) Buffalo, New York; (5) Chicago, Illinois; (6) Dallas, Texas; (7) Los Angeles, California; (8) Richmond, Virginia; (9) Selma, Alabama; (10) Saint Paul, Minnesota; and (11) Battle Creek, (12) Flint, (13) Kalamazoo and (14) Lansing, Michigan. There are also other TRHT-related efforts happening nationally. A primary example being the work of the Association of American Colleges & Universities and their work to establish TRHT Centers at 30 schools across the U.S.

How will the 144 national TRHT partners continue to participate now that the design phase is completed?

arrow_drop_down

As voluntary partners, the individuals and organizations all submitted letters of interest and commitment to the TRHT during the design phase. Each individual and organization was asked to agree to the TRHT Guiding Principles throughout the design phase and beyond. Going forward, many of the organizations are utilizing the implementation recommendations within their organizations and are making themselves available to the TRHT place efforts as resources in their areas of knowledge and influence.

Why did the Kellogg Foundation initiate TRHT?

arrow_drop_down

The Kellogg Foundation has had a decades-long commitment to advancing racial equity and racial healing nationally and in communities. In the most recent 10 years of investment in these areas, the work revealed a clear need to focus more energy, resources and discourse on uprooting and eliminating the false ideology of a hierarchy of human value so that all of us could begin to effectively transform the places we live, learn work and play. The TRHT was launched as a way to co-develop a process by which communities and this country could begin doing that.

Is the TRHT the same as a Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC)?

arrow_drop_down

Across the world, TRCs are well known, having been implemented more than 40 times, but the TRHT is focusing less on reconciliation and much more on healing and transformation. To reconcile connotes restoration of friendly relations – “reuniting” or “bringing together again after conflict.” But the U.S. needs transformation: the nation was conceived in the Constitution and built on this belief in racial hierarchy, a collective national consciousness that has dominated the educational, economic, social and legal discourse for centuries. While, as well noted, resistance and episodic movements through history have contributed to measurable progress, the TRHT will provide needed, collective commitment and long-term determination to embrace a new narrative for the country, a belief in equal humanity for all people.

How were these places chosen? What criteria was used to select them?

arrow_drop_down

During its design phase in 2016, the Kellogg Foundation began receiving calls inquiring about its TRHT process from communities looking for assistance in responding to significant local racial incidents. This foundation heard this need and wanted to connect the need to its larger and ongoing efforts to advance racial equity and racial healing. Because, while the TRHT is not a framework for responding to incidents as they happen, it can help communities in addressing the underlying root cause of why these incidents often happen in the first place – structural racism. Ultimately, the foundation selected the 14 places based on the calls it received from communities who indicated their readiness as well as communities where the foundation already had active priority place-based work. In terms of criteria, the foundation selected TRHT places based on three factors: (1) interest and commitment to TRHT; (2) history of that place; and (3) readiness for a TRHT process. Each TRHT place submitted a concept paper drafted by a multi-sector coalition and through the review of the paper and proposal, the final 14 were selected.

How much has the Kellogg Foundation invested in TRHT place grants?

arrow_drop_down

In 2017, the Kellogg Foundation committed approximately $24 million over the next two-to-five years to 14 TRHT places. Each place received a grant investment for implementing their TRHT and in a growth fund to sustain the work for the long-term locally. The growth fund is also a place where additional funding is being raised and matched by other national, regional and local foundations. The investments in each place range from approximately $1.5 to $4 million and implementation can be from two-to-five years.

Will the Kellogg Foundation be supporting other TRHT places in the future?

arrow_drop_down

At this time, the Kellogg Foundation is not actively seeking proposals from other places interested in doing a TRHT process. There are a few active conversations in priority places in which WKKF does additional work related to its mission – about potential TRHTs in the future. However, the TRHT Implementation Guide available on racialequityresourceguide.org is available to anyone interested in learning and applying the TRHT process for individuals, an organization, a community or a tribe.

What is racial healing?

arrow_drop_down

To heal is to restore to wholeness; to repair damage; and to set right. Healing a societal racial divide requires recognition of the need to acknowledge the wrongs of the past, while addressing the consequences of those wrongs.

Is TRHT going to do more than just get people to “talk” about race?

arrow_drop_down

Yes. The TRHT process is a comprehensive effort. It does include conversation and dialogue as essential components to make it work. However, after participants get to know one another and build relationships, the process also involves developing a plan for creating transformational change in one or more areas: the economy, the law and in separation – the things that keep us a part like residential segregation and colonization.

When talking about racial healing, who should be healed, and whose responsibility is it to make healing happen?

arrow_drop_down

The Kellogg Foundation believes that racism affects all people from all backgrounds. Racial healing is a process that can benefit all people because, regardless of background, we are all living in and affected by the same racialized world. It is our belief that because of this, all of us can benefit from participating in racial healing work and the deep, meaningful relationships that can emerge. And, we believe that is all of our responsibilities to make it happen. It is not one person’s, one group’s or one organization’s responsibility. The responsibility belongs to all of us.

What do you mean by narrative change as part of the TRHT?

arrow_drop_down

Narrative change means examining how to create and distribute new narratives in entertainment, the media, school curricula, museums, monuments and parks, and in the ways we communicate that can influence people’s perspectives, perceptions and behaviors about and towards one another – so that we can work more effectively and productively towards community-based change. At times this may mean that we need to tell necessary and uncomfortable truths. This can be restorative because it can acknowledge the pain and suffering of racism and the resistance and resilience of those impacted. The TRHT supports people of all ages, races, ethnicities, faiths, cultures and socioeconomic statuses coming together to shape narratives about the past, present, and future – complete and accurate stories that honor the full complexity of our humanity as the country forges a more equitable future.

With a Little

Help From Our Friends

The Kellogg Foundation is grateful to its honorary TRHT co-chairs – the late and former Mississippi Governor William Winter and the former Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick. We also extend gratitude to Dr. Gail C. Christopher, our former senior advisor and vice president for TRHT. Her vision and leadership was significant in architecting the 2016 TRHT design phase, which engaged 176 leaders and scholars from 144 national organizations with a reach of more than 289 people. This robust community engagement process resulted in a set of recommendations and an Implementation Guide to inform community-led TRHT processes. We anticipate ongoing collaboration with these leaders in their organizations, their sectors, on the ground in communities as well as through our annual National Day of Racial Healing, which falls the Tuesday immediately following Martin Luther King, Jr., Day.

Act III Productions

Action Communication and Education

Advancement Project

AFL-CIO Housing Investment Trust

American Library Association

American Public Health Association

American Society for Public Administration

Arab American National Museum

Ashé Cultural Arts Center

Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum

Asian Americans Advancing Justice | AAJC

Asian Pacific Community in Action

Association of American Colleges and Universities

Be Bold Media

Beloved Community Center of Greensboro

Black Women’s Blueprint, Inc.

Blacks in Government

Boys and Girls Clubs of America

W. Haywood Burns Institute

The Center for Justice and Peacebuilding at Eastern Mennonite University

Center for Policing Equity

Center for Social Inclusion

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

College Unbound

ColorOfChange.org

Coming to the Table

Common Cause

Community Action Partnership

Council for a Strong America

Council of State Governments

Council on Social Work Education

Demos

Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)

DiversityData.org Project

Farmworker Justice

First Alaskans Institute

Futuro Media Group

Government Alliance on Race and Equity

The Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society

Health Equity Initiative

Imagining America: Artists and Scholars in Public Life

Initiatives of Change, USA

International Association of Official Human Rights Agencies

International City/County Management Association

Jack and Jill of America

Jobs With Justice

The Kellogg Fellows Leadership Alliance

The Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity

The Lakeshore Ethnic Diversity Alliance

Little Black Pearl Art and Design Center

Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce

MACRO Ventures

Maine-Wabanaki REACH

NAACP

National Association of Community and Restorative Justice

National Civic League

National Collaborative for Health Equity

National Compadres Network

National Congress of American Indians

National Council of Asian Pacific Americans

National Council of La Raza

National Hispanic Media Coalition

National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA)

National League of Cities

National Network for Safe Communities at John Jay College

National Park Foundation

National Urban League

Neighborhood Associates Corporation

Northeastern University School of Journalism

Opportunity Finance Network

Perception Institute

People Improving Communities through Organizing (PICO) National

Poverty & Race Research Action Council

Progress Investment Management Company

Quad Caucus

Race Forward

Radio Bilingüe

Restorative Justice for Oakland Youth

Rosenberg Foundation

South Asian Americans Leading Together (SAALT)

Schultz Family Foundation

Search for Common Ground

Shangri La Center for Islamic Arts and Cultures

Sojourners

Southeastern Council of Foundations

Southern Poverty Law Center

SOZE

Safe Places for Advancement of Community and Equity (SPACEs)

State Priorities Partnership

Steps Coalition

Sundance Institute

Third Sector New England

Transformative Justice Coalition

University and Community Action for Racial Equity (UCARE) at the University of Virginia

US Human Rights Network

Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers

Within Our Lifetime Network

YWCA USA

Dolores Acevedo Garcia

Brandeis University

Daniel Nane Alejandres

Santa Cruz Barrios Unidos

Lloyd Asato

Asian Pacific Community in Action

Algernon Austin

Center for Global Policy Solutions

Douglas Blackmon

Slavery by Another Name

Judge Thomas Boyd

55th Circuit

David Campt

America Listens

Ruben E. Canedo

Division of Equity & Inclusion at UC Berkeley

Julie Ann Crommet

Google

Fanshen Cox Digiovanni

Pearl Street Productions and One Drop of Love

Nancy Dorsinville

Harvard University

Kevin Fong

Elemental Partners

David Hunt

David Hunt & Associates

Yvette Joseph

Kaufman & Associates

Karina Kogan

Participant Media

Debra Lynn Langford

The Langford Company

Simone Ling

Story Consultant and Independent Producer

John McCoy

Washington State Senate

Paula Williams Madison

Madison Media Management

Joe Martinez

Health Action New Mexico

Judy R. Morse

City of New Orleans

Reilly Morse

Mississippi Center for Justice

Minh Nguyen

VAYLA

Natasha O'Dell Archer

The Opportunity Institute

Erica Okezie Phillips

Ontario Ministry of Education

Michelle Otero

Valle Encantado

Tha Par

Kellogg Community College

Nate Parker

Actor

Sheri Parks

University of Maryland

Manuel Pastor

University of Southern California

Deval Patrick

Former Governor of Massachusetts

Eliza Perez Ollin

Keith Center for Civil Rights, Wayne State University

Collette Rausch

United States Institute of Peace

Alex Rodriguez

Innovative Consultants International

Bird Runningwater

Sundance Institute

Virginia Sanchez Korrol

Brooklyn College

Teri Schwartz

UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television

Mischa Thompson

Helsinki Commission

Lynn Todman

Lakeland Health

Robin Toma

Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations

Al White

Action, Communication and Education

David Williams

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Leah Wing

University of Massachusetts – Amherst

William Winter

Former Governor of Mississippi

Nina Yang Bongiovani

Significant Productions, MNM Creative
Thank you Partners
An Established History

About the W.K. Kellogg Foundation

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF) was founded in 1930 by breakfast cereal innovator and entrepreneur Will Keith Kellogg. When he established the foundation, he said, “Use the money as you please, so long as it promotes the health, happiness and well-being of children.”

Today, WKKF remains committed to ensuring all children and families – regardless of race or income – have opportunities to reach their full potential. We want all children to live a full life with high-quality, early childhood education and access to good food and health care; to grow up in homes with families that have stable, high-quality jobs; and to live in a community where they are nurtured. Embedded within all that we do is our commitment to racial equity, to developing leaders and to engaging communities in solving their own problems.

WKKF supports this work nationally throughout the United States and with sovereign tribes, and in Mexico and Haiti. And, we concentrate up to two-thirds of our grantmaking in what we call priority places: Michigan, Mississippi, New Mexico and New Orleans in the U.S., Chiapas and the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico, and in Central and South Haiti.

Get Involved

RSVP

Join us for the live premiere of the National Day of Racial Healing on Jan. 18 at 3 p.m. EST / Noon PST.

TELL US ABOUT YOUR VIRTUAL EVENT

To realize a society free of systemic injustice, we must come together to heal, exploring and unraveling the deeply held racial biases of the past.

  • Your Information

  • Event Information

  • MM slash DD slash YYYY
  • :
  • :
  • Location Information

    All 2021 events are virtual. Location information is used to place the virtual event on a map, but the address will not be printed/displayed publicly. Feel free to use your organization’s office address, or the address of a local business.
  • Organization Information

RSVP

Join us for the live premiere of the National Day of Racial Healing on Jan. 19 at 3 p.m. EST / 12 p.m. PST.