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2018 Livestream Broadcast

Healing Hearts with Grace

#NDORH

THE CONVERSATION

Taking Collective Action

FOR RACIAL HEALING

People, organizations and communities throughout the U.S. are coming together on Jan. 16, 2018 to call for racial healing, celebrate their common humanity and take collective action to create a more just and equitable world.

The National Day of Racial Healing (#NDORH) is a part of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation (TRHT) effort – a national and community-based process to plan for and bring about transformational and sustainable change, and to address the historic and contemporary effects of racism.

Jan. 16, 2018 is the second annual National Day of Racial Healing. The day was established in 2017 by more than 550 U.S. leaders who wanted to set aside a day to take action together and:

  1. 1Find ways to reinforce and honor our common humanity and create space to celebrate the distinct differences that make our communities vibrant.
  2. 2Acknowledge that there are still deep racial divisions in America that must be overcome and healed.
  3. 3Commit to engaging people from all racial, ethnic, religious and identity groups in genuine efforts to increase understanding, communication, caring and respect for one another.

Please join us by planning or participating in activities and events in your community and around the country. And, be sure to tag any of your social media activity for the day with #NDORH.

Find or Submit

An Event Near You

Find or submit a National Day of Racial Healing event or activity near you.

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How To

Get Involved

Here are some simple ways to get started and involved.
  • Host a dinner, a conversation or even a racial healing circle at your home and invite your family members, neighbors, friends and others you might not know as well. Whenever possible, invite people from different backgrounds and cultures. (Download a conversation guide here.)
  • Read books to the children in your life that affirm the identities and backgrounds of all children. Check out this list compiled by ADL or the Unity, Kindness and Peace booklist by the American Library Association for ideas.
  • Talk to your elected officials about issuing a local proclamation naming Jan. 16, 2018 the National Day of Racial Healing in your Community. (Download draft proclamation text here.)
  • Host a “Walk for Racial Healing” and invite as many people as possible to participate. Be sure to make your event friendly to people of all ages and abilities.
  • Create an event or activity and invite friends to participate via social media.
  • Make a positive statement by creating signage: “I SUPPORT THE NATIONAL DAY OF RACIAL HEALING on Jan. 16, 2018.” Display your sign on your front door, on your snowman, in a window or on your porch and just about anywhere it can be seen by your friends and neighbors. Download a pre-made sign here.
  • Take a picture holding your sign then make it your temporary profile picture on your social networks leading up to the date. Get your friends involved in doing the same. Or, use one of the NDORH graphics in the Resources section below.
  • Show your support by using the hashtags #NDORH (National Day of Racial Healing) or #TRHT (Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation) in all your social media.
  • Create large posters where people write answers to questions like – ‘My Racial Healing Looks Like _____. Share them on social media.
  • Create a short video addressing why racial healing is important to you and post it on Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat or other social networks. Be sure to use the hashtag #NDORH.
  • Support or setup an online fundraiser for organizations in your area that work towards racial healing.

Preschool Educators

  • Connect with other teachers and suggest an activity that everyone can do from their classrooms. Include the parents of students who home-school in your outreach.
  • Read books aloud that affirm the identities and backgrounds of all children – check out these lists compiled by the ADL, the American Library Association, the School Library Journal, the Saint Paul Public Library, We Need Diverse Books, and the University of Washington Libraries.
  • Organize an age appropriate conversation with the children to first find out what they know about race. For example, the question might be as simple as asking what they know about Asian, Latino/Hispanic, African-American, White, and American Indian/Native American people. Lead them into a conversation about making the world a better place. Emphasize caring about and respecting people of different races.

Elementary and High School Educators

College Educators

  • Reach out to the American Association of Colleges & Universities to collaborate on their efforts as an official partner in Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation efforts.
  • Connect with other universities already organizing activities for MLK day, for example, approach them about integrating racial healing day in to the existing platform.
  • Conduct outreach with the Office of Community Engagement at local colleges and universities.
  • Enlist student organizations (e.g., fraternities, sororities, clubs etc.) in developing special events.
  • Work with Housing and Residence Life in creating programs for dormitories hosted by Resident Assistants (RAs).

All Educators

  • Activate your network of professionals and friends; reach out to everyone you know.
  • Speak at faculty assemblies.
  • Outreach to school Superintendents, Principals, educational associations, higher education, teachers unions, student affairs, student government, community leaders.
  • Make a commitment to continue teaching principles of racial diversity at least one month of every school quarter. Encourage your colleagues to do the same.
  • Send proposals to school districts, parents, youth groups and others inviting them to sponsor events.
  • Plan a social media strategy that reaches young people and, don’t forget to use the hashtags #NDORH (National Day of Racial Healing) and #TRHT (Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation), so everyone can find it.
  • Create and encourage families to participate in special activities related to racial diversity (e.g., after-school program activity).
  • Connect with as many other organizations as possible including local area businesses, Business Associations, Unions, Minority Professional Organizations and others to schedule joint activities such as a lunchtime gathering (e.g., a quarterly series of Lunch and Learns aka Learn at Lunch); your goal is to create a friendly, informal and safe environment for sharing reliable information, inspiring engaging conversations, brainstorming solutions for workplace implementation and eventual measurement.
  • Enlist local area businesses and associations such as your local Chamber of Commerce and others to help sponsor a space for an event held on the Jan. 16, 2018.
  • Tap internal employee resource networks (e.g., work-based social clubs) and encourage them to create a fun and meaningful activity that both encourages participation and highlights everyone’s commitment to workplace racial diversity and equity.
  • Create a Diversity Proclamation and invite businesses you are aligned with to sign; encourage all participating businesses to frame and proudly display the proclamation at their place of business. (Download a template here.)
  • Buy advertising space in local publications (online or in print) to endorse the day and effort. Ads can be simple e.g., (YOUR COMPANY NAME Supports the National Day of Racial Healing, Jan. 16, 2018, or a lengthier article by your company outlining your support. Share your ad in many places such as your website and on social networks where you enjoy membership (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.) and, don’t forget to use the hashtags #NDORH (National Day of Racial Healing) and #TRHT (Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation), so everyone can find it.
  • Join the conversation, share your ideas and inspire others by letting them know what your business has already accomplished to improve diversity, inclusion and racial equity. Utilize social media to participate by creating and posting your “solution stories” to common challenges to implementation.
  • Connect with your local mayor’s office and talk about a cooperative project that can focus on issues related to diversity in your community. Or, ask your mayor to issue a local proclamation naming Jan. 16, 2018 the National Day of Racial healing. (Download draft proclamation text here.)
  • Make a dollars and cents (sense) argument that companies/businesses who have implemented culturally appropriate/racially equitable strategies are profitable. Use the WKKF Business Case for Racial Equity
  • Open the dialogue. Identify and invite other community-based faith-leaders and their congregants (of all denominations) to your place of worship on Jan. 16, 2018.
  • Take up a collection to support interfaith groups and organizations working towards racial equity and social justice. Discover how you can participate.
  • Identify existing faith-based activists, nonprofit organizations and others who are engaged in community racial healing. Invite them to support activities that you have developed or to create one of their own making. Don’t just preach to the choir – approach faith-based institutions across the spectrum from conservative to progressive.
  • Use existing events to help spread the word and to encourage others to take part in the National Day of Racial Healing on Jan. 16.
  • Help get the message out that it’s important to come together. Make announcements on your day of worship and encourage congregants of all ages to create or join the effort.
  • Work cooperatively with the leaderships of other local congregations; assign delegates/goodwill ambassadors to visit those congregations. Make short presentations, solicit their input for event ideas, hosting their own event and invite them to join.
  • Support a moment of silence and contemplation to be jointly held at a mutually agreeable time.
  • Join the conversation on social networks using the hashtags #NDORH (National Day of Racial Healing) and #TRHT (Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation) and encourage others to do the same.
  • Connect with other local foundations or your grantees to co-develop a meaningful and memorable program for the day.
  • Create and invite other local foundations to sign a public pledge committing to investing in anti-racism initiatives. This would include a framework for strategies that favorably impact communities.
  • Provide scholarships or grants to students of all ages to support meaningful activities related to advancing racial equity and diversity in your local community.
  • Start a letter/email and/or phone campaign to address problems related to how resources are allocated to diversity and racial healing efforts. Invite your audience to take part in a local area event of your own creation or with an organization you have developed a partnership with.
  • Take to social networks with a show of support using the hashtags #NDORH (National Day of Racial Healing) and #TRHT (Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation).
  • Become an active part of the solution year-round. Invest in educational programs directly tied to discussing and fostering a positive environment of racial healing.
  • Buy advertising space in local publications (online or in print) to amplify the day’s activities and purpose. Ads can be simple e.g., (YOUR ORGANIZATION’S NAME) Supports the National Day of Racial Healing, Jan. 16, 2018 or a lengthier article by your organization regarding support. Share your ad in many places such as your website and social networks where you enjoy membership (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, Instagram etc.) and, don’t forget to use the hashtags #NDORH (National Day of Racial Healing) and #TRHT (Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation), so everyone can find it.
  • Engage the support of local celebrities you know to take an active part in area activities.
  • We are grateful to WebJunction for pulling together this list of 10 ways your library and community can recognize NDORH.
  • 1.   Promote relevant and inspiring books through displays and recommendations lists. Here are some lists to explore:
          •    Saint Paul Public Library’s Resources on Race
          •    An Expanded Cultural Diversity Booklist, from School Library Journal readers
          •    A Collection of Diverse Book Lists, from WeNeedDiverseBooks.org
          •    Resisting Racism, a research guide from University of Washington Libraries
          •    ADL’s Children’s Literature List
          •    Unity, Kindness and Peace Booklist by ALA (pdf)
  • 2.   Invite your library book club to select a book to read in honor of NDORH, or use the day to invite the whole community to begin to read the same book. Here’s how a book club in Battle Creek, Michigan got involved last year.
  • 3.   Host a discussion at the library in collaboration with other local community organizations. Use the NDORH Conversation Guide (pdf)
  • 4.   Host a film screening or other cultural event like storytelling or musical performances.
  • 5.   Dedicate a space in the library for people to share their declarations, “I will promote racial healing by _____” or “My racial healing looks like _____.” Use a white board or wall, or see this example from last year of an invitation to post selfies on social media.
  • 6.   Explore WebJunction’s Access & Equity topic area to see how libraries and their communities are increasing inclusion and advancing racial equity. Begin with Racial Equity in the Library, Part 1 and Part 2.
  • 7.   Submit your event or find another near you, via the NDORH website.
  • 8.   Engage in social media with the NDORH Facebook page and on Twitter @thedaytoheal. using this year’s hashtags: #NDORH and #TRHT.
  • 9.   Explore the multitude of other resources on the NDORH website, including resources for educators, an engagement guide, key messages, social media graphics, customizable poster template, NDORH signs (“I Support the National Day of Racial Healing on 1-16-18”), and proclamation texts that can be used by organizations or government officials (e.g., mayors and governors).
  • 10.   Apply for the Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation Great Stories Club! ALA invites libraries to apply for a pilot of the Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation Great Stories Club, a thematic reading and discussion program series that will engage underserved teens through literature-based library outreach programs and racial healing work. The pilot is supported by a grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. (Key dates: register for a free Jan. 12 webinar to learn more and apply by Feb. 16, 2018)

Individuals

arrow_drop_down

  • Host a dinner, a conversation or even a racial healing circle at your home and invite your family members, neighbors, friends and others you might not know as well. Whenever possible, invite people from different backgrounds and cultures. (Download a conversation guide here.)
  • Read books to the children in your life that affirm the identities and backgrounds of all children. Check out this list compiled by ADL or the Unity, Kindness and Peace booklist by the American Library Association for ideas.
  • Talk to your elected officials about issuing a local proclamation naming Jan. 16, 2018 the National Day of Racial Healing in your Community. (Download draft proclamation text here.)
  • Host a “Walk for Racial Healing” and invite as many people as possible to participate. Be sure to make your event friendly to people of all ages and abilities.
  • Create an event or activity and invite friends to participate via social media.
  • Make a positive statement by creating signage: “I SUPPORT THE NATIONAL DAY OF RACIAL HEALING on Jan. 16, 2018.” Display your sign on your front door, on your snowman, in a window or on your porch and just about anywhere it can be seen by your friends and neighbors. Download a pre-made sign here.
  • Take a picture holding your sign then make it your temporary profile picture on your social networks leading up to the date. Get your friends involved in doing the same. Or, use one of the NDORH graphics in the Resources section below.
  • Show your support by using the hashtags #NDORH (National Day of Racial Healing) or #TRHT (Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation) in all your social media.
  • Create large posters where people write answers to questions like – ‘My Racial Healing Looks Like _____. Share them on social media.
  • Create a short video addressing why racial healing is important to you and post it on Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat or other social networks. Be sure to use the hashtag #NDORH.
  • Support or setup an online fundraiser for organizations in your area that work towards racial healing.

Educators

arrow_drop_down

Preschool Educators

  • Connect with other teachers and suggest an activity that everyone can do from their classrooms. Include the parents of students who home-school in your outreach.
  • Read books aloud that affirm the identities and backgrounds of all children – check out these lists compiled by the ADL, the American Library Association, the School Library Journal, the Saint Paul Public Library, We Need Diverse Books, and the University of Washington Libraries.
  • Organize an age appropriate conversation with the children to first find out what they know about race. For example, the question might be as simple as asking what they know about Asian, Latino/Hispanic, African-American, White, and American Indian/Native American people. Lead them into a conversation about making the world a better place. Emphasize caring about and respecting people of different races.

Elementary and High School Educators

College Educators

  • Reach out to the American Association of Colleges & Universities to collaborate on their efforts as an official partner in Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation efforts.
  • Connect with other universities already organizing activities for MLK day, for example, approach them about integrating racial healing day in to the existing platform.
  • Conduct outreach with the Office of Community Engagement at local colleges and universities.
  • Enlist student organizations (e.g., fraternities, sororities, clubs etc.) in developing special events.
  • Work with Housing and Residence Life in creating programs for dormitories hosted by Resident Assistants (RAs).

All Educators

  • Activate your network of professionals and friends; reach out to everyone you know.
  • Speak at faculty assemblies.
  • Outreach to school Superintendents, Principals, educational associations, higher education, teachers unions, student affairs, student government, community leaders.
  • Make a commitment to continue teaching principles of racial diversity at least one month of every school quarter. Encourage your colleagues to do the same.
  • Send proposals to school districts, parents, youth groups and others inviting them to sponsor events.
  • Plan a social media strategy that reaches young people and, don’t forget to use the hashtags #NDORH (National Day of Racial Healing) and #TRHT (Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation), so everyone can find it.
  • Create and encourage families to participate in special activities related to racial diversity (e.g., after-school program activity).

Business

arrow_drop_down

  • Connect with as many other organizations as possible including local area businesses, Business Associations, Unions, Minority Professional Organizations and others to schedule joint activities such as a lunchtime gathering (e.g., a quarterly series of Lunch and Learns aka Learn at Lunch); your goal is to create a friendly, informal and safe environment for sharing reliable information, inspiring engaging conversations, brainstorming solutions for workplace implementation and eventual measurement.
  • Enlist local area businesses and associations such as your local Chamber of Commerce and others to help sponsor a space for an event held on the Jan. 16, 2018.
  • Tap internal employee resource networks (e.g., work-based social clubs) and encourage them to create a fun and meaningful activity that both encourages participation and highlights everyone’s commitment to workplace racial diversity and equity.
  • Create a Diversity Proclamation and invite businesses you are aligned with to sign; encourage all participating businesses to frame and proudly display the proclamation at their place of business. (Download a template here.)
  • Buy advertising space in local publications (online or in print) to endorse the day and effort. Ads can be simple e.g., (YOUR COMPANY NAME Supports the National Day of Racial Healing, Jan. 16, 2018, or a lengthier article by your company outlining your support. Share your ad in many places such as your website and on social networks where you enjoy membership (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.) and, don’t forget to use the hashtags #NDORH (National Day of Racial Healing) and #TRHT (Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation), so everyone can find it.
  • Join the conversation, share your ideas and inspire others by letting them know what your business has already accomplished to improve diversity, inclusion and racial equity. Utilize social media to participate by creating and posting your “solution stories” to common challenges to implementation.
  • Connect with your local mayor’s office and talk about a cooperative project that can focus on issues related to diversity in your community. Or, ask your mayor to issue a local proclamation naming Jan. 16, 2018 the National Day of Racial healing. (Download draft proclamation text here.)
  • Make a dollars and cents (sense) argument that companies/businesses who have implemented culturally appropriate/racially equitable strategies are profitable. Use the WKKF Business Case for Racial Equity

Faith & Spirituality

arrow_drop_down

  • Open the dialogue. Identify and invite other community-based faith-leaders and their congregants (of all denominations) to your place of worship on Jan. 16, 2018.
  • Take up a collection to support interfaith groups and organizations working towards racial equity and social justice. Discover how you can participate.
  • Identify existing faith-based activists, nonprofit organizations and others who are engaged in community racial healing. Invite them to support activities that you have developed or to create one of their own making. Don’t just preach to the choir – approach faith-based institutions across the spectrum from conservative to progressive.
  • Use existing events to help spread the word and to encourage others to take part in the National Day of Racial Healing on Jan. 16.
  • Help get the message out that it’s important to come together. Make announcements on your day of worship and encourage congregants of all ages to create or join the effort.
  • Work cooperatively with the leaderships of other local congregations; assign delegates/goodwill ambassadors to visit those congregations. Make short presentations, solicit their input for event ideas, hosting their own event and invite them to join.
  • Support a moment of silence and contemplation to be jointly held at a mutually agreeable time.
  • Join the conversation on social networks using the hashtags #NDORH (National Day of Racial Healing) and #TRHT (Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation) and encourage others to do the same.

Philanthropy

arrow_drop_down

  • Connect with other local foundations or your grantees to co-develop a meaningful and memorable program for the day.
  • Create and invite other local foundations to sign a public pledge committing to investing in anti-racism initiatives. This would include a framework for strategies that favorably impact communities.
  • Provide scholarships or grants to students of all ages to support meaningful activities related to advancing racial equity and diversity in your local community.
  • Start a letter/email and/or phone campaign to address problems related to how resources are allocated to diversity and racial healing efforts. Invite your audience to take part in a local area event of your own creation or with an organization you have developed a partnership with.
  • Take to social networks with a show of support using the hashtags #NDORH (National Day of Racial Healing) and #TRHT (Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation).
  • Become an active part of the solution year-round. Invest in educational programs directly tied to discussing and fostering a positive environment of racial healing.
  • Buy advertising space in local publications (online or in print) to amplify the day’s activities and purpose. Ads can be simple e.g., (YOUR ORGANIZATION’S NAME) Supports the National Day of Racial Healing, Jan. 16, 2018 or a lengthier article by your organization regarding support. Share your ad in many places such as your website and social networks where you enjoy membership (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, Instagram etc.) and, don’t forget to use the hashtags #NDORH (National Day of Racial Healing) and #TRHT (Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation), so everyone can find it.
  • Engage the support of local celebrities you know to take an active part in area activities.

Libraries

arrow_drop_down

  • We are grateful to WebJunction for pulling together this list of 10 ways your library and community can recognize NDORH.
  • 1.   Promote relevant and inspiring books through displays and recommendations lists. Here are some lists to explore:
          •    Saint Paul Public Library’s Resources on Race
          •    An Expanded Cultural Diversity Booklist, from School Library Journal readers
          •    A Collection of Diverse Book Lists, from WeNeedDiverseBooks.org
          •    Resisting Racism, a research guide from University of Washington Libraries
          •    ADL’s Children’s Literature List
          •    Unity, Kindness and Peace Booklist by ALA (pdf)
  • 2.   Invite your library book club to select a book to read in honor of NDORH, or use the day to invite the whole community to begin to read the same book. Here’s how a book club in Battle Creek, Michigan got involved last year.
  • 3.   Host a discussion at the library in collaboration with other local community organizations. Use the NDORH Conversation Guide (pdf)
  • 4.   Host a film screening or other cultural event like storytelling or musical performances.
  • 5.   Dedicate a space in the library for people to share their declarations, “I will promote racial healing by _____” or “My racial healing looks like _____.” Use a white board or wall, or see this example from last year of an invitation to post selfies on social media.
  • 6.   Explore WebJunction’s Access & Equity topic area to see how libraries and their communities are increasing inclusion and advancing racial equity. Begin with Racial Equity in the Library, Part 1 and Part 2.
  • 7.   Submit your event or find another near you, via the NDORH website.
  • 8.   Engage in social media with the NDORH Facebook page and on Twitter @thedaytoheal. using this year’s hashtags: #NDORH and #TRHT.
  • 9.   Explore the multitude of other resources on the NDORH website, including resources for educators, an engagement guide, key messages, social media graphics, customizable poster template, NDORH signs (“I Support the National Day of Racial Healing on 1-16-18”), and proclamation texts that can be used by organizations or government officials (e.g., mayors and governors).
  • 10.   Apply for the Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation Great Stories Club! ALA invites libraries to apply for a pilot of the Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation Great Stories Club, a thematic reading and discussion program series that will engage underserved teens through literature-based library outreach programs and racial healing work. The pilot is supported by a grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. (Key dates: register for a free Jan. 12 webinar to learn more and apply by Feb. 16, 2018)

Helpful

RESOURCES

A successful and impactful NDORH takes coordination, planning and promotion. This engagement guide is offered as a resource to support your efforts.

Download Guide

Other NDORH Resources

Get Involved